Banteay Srei Temple

Posted by IntoCambodia Team on 12 November 2017
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Banteay Srei temple is a 10th-century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of  Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art.
Banteay Srei Temple

Banteay Srei temple, the citadel of women, is an exquisite miniature, a fairy palace in the heart of an immense and mysterious forest; the very thing that Grimm delighted to image, and that every child's heart has yearned after, but which mature years have sadly proved to lovely to be true.

Consecrated on 22 April 967 A.D, Banteay Srei was speculated to have been known earlier as Banteay Serai, which literally means the Citadel of Victory. This was the only major temple of Angkor not built by a monarch; its construction is credited to a courtier named Yajnavaraha, who was a scholar and Philanthropist and a counselor to king Rajendravarman. He was known to have helped those who suffered from illness, injustice or poverty.

Banteay Srei is built primarily in red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable in fine details today. Measured by standard Angkorian construction, the buildings themselves are miniature in scale. These factors have led to its being widely praised as a precious gem, or the jewel of Khmer art and perhaps the temple’s modern name, Banteay Srei or Citadel of Women, is probably related to the intricacy of the bas-relief carvings of devatas found on the walls and the tiny dimensions of the buildings themselves.