World Heritage

Lakhaon Khaol (Male Masked Theatre)
Many tangible and intangible heritage of Cambodia have helped the country to become well-known on the international stage and they are vital player on the world heritage stage. One of those is Lakhaon Khol.
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Apsara Dance
There are many classical dance forms in Cambodia, of which a highly stylized art form was once confined mainly to the courts of the royal palace and performed mainly by females. Known formally in Khmer as Robam Apsara, the dancers of this classical form are often referred to as Apsara dancers. Apsara Dance is one of many dances in the Khmer Classical Dance. This dance invented in the mid-20th Century by the Royal Ballet of Cambodia, under the patronage of Queen Sisowat Kosamak. This dance form was first introduced to foreign countries and best known during the 1960s as the Khmer Royal Ballet. The first royal ballerina was Princess Norodom Sihanuk.
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Preah Vihea Temple
The Preah Vihear temple is a Khmer temple located spectacularly atop Pey Tadi, slightly east of the midsection of the mountain range of the Dangrek, being in Svay Chrum village, Kan Tout commune, Choam Khsant district, in the Preah Vihear province of northern Cambodia. It is also perched on the edge of a giant cliff, 525-meter (1720 ft) above the Cambodian plain and 625-meter (2051ft) above sea level. Lying out on an 800-meter north-south axis, the Preah Vihear complex has a single imposing approach, leading up through a series of five Gopura (towered entrance pavilions) connected by causeways and 120-meter-long steps. The temple gives its name to Cambodia’s Preah Vihear province and is 140km from Angkor Wat; approximately 460 km from Phnom Penh. 
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Temple Zone of Sambor Prei Kuk Archaeological Site of Ancient Ishanapura
The archaeological site of Sambor Prei Kuk, “the temple in the richness of the forest” in the Khmer language, has been identified as Ishanapura, the capital of the Chenla Empire (Chenla Kingdom) that flourished in the late 6th and early 7th till 9th centuries CE. It is located in Kampong Thom Province, 30 km (19 miles) north of Stueng Sen city, 176 km (109 miles) east of Angkor and 206 (128 miles) north of Phnom Penh.
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Angkor Wat
In the Angkorean era, the ancient Khmer Kingdom dominated most of present Southeast Asia from 800 to 1430 AD. The Angkor Complex is the soul of Khmer people (approximately 90% of Cambodia Population). Inside the Angkor-complex area consist of 200 monuments, which spread over an area of 400 square kilometers. There are various Khmer temples were built between the 7th and 13th centuries by Khmer kings when the Khmer civilization was at its height of the extraordinary creativity. The Angkor architecture serves as the evidence of the strong Khmer religious beliefs - Hinduism and Buddhism. And, the most popular temples in the Angkor area are Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bayon, Baphuon, Phimeanakas, Ta Keo, Ta Prohm, Banteay Kdei, Pré Roup, East Mebon, Kravan, Preah Khan, Neak Poan, Banteay Srey, Rolous Group, etc.
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Tugging Rituals and Games
Tugging rituals and games in the rice-farming cultures of East Asia and Southeast Asia are enacted among communities to ensure abundant harvests and prosperity. They promote social solidarity, provide entertainment and mark the start of a new agricultural cycle. Many tugging rituals and games also have profound religious significance.
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Chapei Dang Veng
Chapei Dang Veng (A Cambodian two-stringed, long-necked guitar) is used in Arak and Pleng Ka orchestras. Moreover, it is also performed solo instruments accompaniment of poetry, narrated folk stories, vocal duets of an argumentative style and riddle telling. Due to this special feature of the instrument which has brought it great popularity from early times right up to today and its music has been delighted by the Khmer people for many generations. 
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Sbaek Lakhaoun (Shadow Puppetry Theatre)
It is believed shadow leather originated in Cambodia probably in the pre-Angkor period. Based on the evidence, for example, the stone inscription (K.155) at Kuk Roka, Kompong Thom from the pre-Angkor period, which describes woman puppeteers in a performance using figures in a ceremony invoking Sarasvati, the goddess of learning and the arts. This confirms the use of small puppet images in religious ceremonies. Based on this inscription, we believe that Khmer puppets originated in the pre-Angkor period (9th Century). 
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