Cambodia's

Angkor Wat
In the Angkorean era, the ancient Khmer Kingdom dominated most of present Southeast Asia from 800 to 1430 AD. The Angkor Complex is the soul of Khmer people (approximately 90% of Cambodia Population). Inside the Angkor-complex area consist of 200 monuments, which spread over an area of 400 square kilometers. There are various Khmer temples were built between the 7th and 13th centuries by Khmer kings when the Khmer civilization was at its height of the extraordinary creativity. The Angkor architecture serves as the evidence of the strong Khmer religious beliefs - Hinduism and Buddhism. And, the most popular temples in the Angkor area are Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bayon, Baphuon, Phimeanakas, Ta Keo, Ta Prohm, Banteay Kdei, Pré Roup, East Mebon, Kravan, Preah Khan, Neak Poan, Banteay Srey, Rolous Group, etc.
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Apsara Dance
There are many classical dance forms in Cambodia, of which a highly stylized art form was once confined mainly to the courts of the royal palace and performed mainly by females. Known formally in Khmer as Robam Apsara, the dancers of this classical form are often referred to as Apsara dancers. Apsara Dance is one of many dances in the Khmer Classical Dance. This dance invented in the mid-20th Century by the Royal Ballet of Cambodia, under the patronage of Queen Sisowat Kosamak. This dance form was first introduced to foreign countries and best known during the 1960s as the Khmer Royal Ballet. The first royal ballerina was Princess Norodom Sihanuk.
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Bakheng Temple
Phnom Bakheng is a Hindu and Buddhist temple in the form of a temple mountain at Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. The construction of this temple mountain on Phnom Bakheng, the first major temple to be constructed in the Angkor area, marked the move of the capital of the Khmer empire from the capital Hariharalaya in the Roluos area to Angkor in late 9th century A.D.
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Banteay Srei Temple
Banteay Srei temple is a 10th-century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of  Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art.
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Bayon Temple
Bayon temple is a well-known and richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor area in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII, the Bayon stands at the center of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom. Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences.
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Bet Paun or Hiding Game
Bet Paun is a game where young boys and girls always play on the night of the dawn. This game is played indefinitely in any season or month, as long as there is leisure time and no limit to the number of people. The measure of this game consists of the one who hides the others and the searcher. When the searcher catching the hide players and rounded their ears.
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Bokator
Bokator, known formally as Labokator, is a Khmer material art form that involves close hand-to-hand combat, ground techniques, and weapons. Bokator is one of the earliest Khmer material art and second in age only to the Mon-Khmer style of Yuthakun Khom. Moreover, this martial art is said to be the close quarter combat system used by the armies during the Angkor era. Practitioners are trained to strike with knees, elbows, hands feet, and even the head. Short sticks are commonly used as a weapon.
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Bos Angkunh
Bos Angkunh is a popular Khmer traditional game played especially during Khmer New Year at villages, or schools, especially at the pagodas. Angkunh is called after one kind of dried fruit from a climbing plant in Cambodia. Normally, this game could help maintain people's mental and physical dexterity. This game is an entertainment, which assists people coordinating their hands and eyes, and it also enhances the concentration of people.
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Cambodia National Flag
There were different flags used as the national flag of Cambodia since 1863. The Cambodian flag has three stripes and the middle one is larger than the blue ones which are at the top and the bottom. However, the middle stripe is red with the Angkor Wat in the middle of the flag.
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Central Market (Psar Thom Thmei)
The vibrant capital is filled with far more color and culture, and some of the best places to witness the unmatched charm of the city are at its traditional markets. There should be plenty of time to go shopping in many markets. The Pksar Thom Thmei or the Central Market erected in Art Deco in 1930 (1935-1937) is a Phnom Penh landmark.
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Chapei Dang Veng
Chapei Dang Veng (A Cambodian two-stringed, long-necked guitar) is used in Arak and Pleng Ka orchestras. Moreover, it is also performed solo instruments accompaniment of poetry, narrated folk stories, vocal duets of an argumentative style and riddle telling. Due to this special feature of the instrument which has brought it great popularity from early times right up to today and its music has been delighted by the Khmer people for many generations. 
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Chek Pong Moin (Musa Aromatic): The National Fruit of Cambodia

The National fruit of Cambodia is Chicken egg banana. The banana is regarded as the national fruit of Cambodia among the most other valuable plants and provides many benefits to society same as a palm tree and Rumdoul flower.

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