Lakhaon Poul Srei (Female Masked Theatre)
Lakhaon Poul Srei is the female version of Lakhaon Khaol (classical male masked theater), which literally translates as 'female narration'. Both forms combine classical theater and dance and are accompanied by the traditional pin peat orchestra. Unlike Lakhaon Khaol, which use a separate group of narrators, Lakhaon Poul Srei dancers take turns narrating while other members continue to dance. The dancers often lift their masks and narrate directly to the audience.
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Water and Moon Festival (Bon Om Tuk, Bondet Protit, Sam Peah Preah Khae)
The kingdom of Cambodia has a wealth of traditional and cultural festivals dated according to the Cambodian lunar calendar.  All these festival are influenced by the concept of Buddhism, Hinduism, and royal cultures. The festivals, which serves as a source of great joy, merriment and Cambodian’s national colors, play a major role in influencing tourists’ opinions, behaviors, and options. Most of these are a time of replacing the predominantly urban and rural populace.
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Koh Ker Temple
Koh Ker Temple in Preah Vihear province is constituted as “one of the marvels of Cambodian monumental heritage” by UNESCO. The temple is located in Srayong commune, Kulen district, Preah Vihear province, about 120 km from Siem Reap.
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Bakheng Temple
Phnom Bakheng is a Hindu and Buddhist temple in the form of a temple mountain at Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. The construction of this temple mountain on Phnom Bakheng, the first major temple to be constructed in the Angkor area, marked the move of the capital of the Khmer empire from the capital Hariharalaya in the Roluos area to Angkor in late 9th century A.D.
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Temple Zone of Sambor Prei Kuk Archaeological Site of Ancient Ishanapura
The archaeological site of Sambor Prei Kuk, “the temple in the richness of the forest” in the Khmer language, has been identified as Ishanapura, the capital of the Chenla Empire (Chenla Kingdom) that flourished in the late 6th and early 7th till 9th centuries CE. It is located in Kampong Thom Province, 30 km (19 miles) north of Stueng Sen city, 176 km (109 miles) east of Angkor and 206 (128 miles) north of Phnom Penh.
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Wat Phnom

The Wat Phnom Temple is the most significant of all the temples in Phnom Penh. The temple has a close-knitted relationship to the capital city.

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Sampeah
The Sampeah is a Cambodian traditionally greeting style or way of showing respect. While performing the salutation or mutual recognition “Sampeah”, people have to raise both hands, places our palms together in the lotus-like fashion while bowing slightly. The word often spoken with the Sampeah when greeting to somebody is Chumreap Suor, while Chumreap Lea is spoken when saying goodbye.
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Banteay Srei Temple
Banteay Srei temple is a 10th-century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of  Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art.
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Bayon Temple
Bayon temple is a well-known and richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor area in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII, the Bayon stands at the center of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom. Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences.
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Independence Monument

Erect in 1955, the Independence Monument symbolizes Cambodian Independence gained from French colonialism in 1953. It stands on the intersection of Norodom Boulevard and Sihanouk Boulevard in the center of the city.

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Angkor Wat
In the Angkorean era, the ancient Khmer Kingdom dominated most of present Southeast Asia from 800 to 1430 AD. The Angkor Complex is the soul of Khmer people (approximately 90% of Cambodia Population). Inside the Angkor-complex area consist of 200 monuments, which spread over an area of 400 square kilometers. There are various Khmer temples were built between the 7th and 13th centuries by Khmer kings when the Khmer civilization was at its height of the extraordinary creativity. The Angkor architecture serves as the evidence of the strong Khmer religious beliefs - Hinduism and Buddhism. And, the most popular temples in the Angkor area are Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bayon, Baphuon, Phimeanakas, Ta Keo, Ta Prohm, Banteay Kdei, Pré Roup, East Mebon, Kravan, Preah Khan, Neak Poan, Banteay Srey, Rolous Group, etc.
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Preah Vihea Temple
The Preah Vihear temple is a Khmer temple located spectacularly atop Pey Tadi, slightly east of the midsection of the mountain range of the Dangrek, being in Svay Chrum village, Kan Tout commune, Choam Khsant district, in the Preah Vihear province of northern Cambodia. It is also perched on the edge of a giant cliff, 525-meter (1720 ft) above the Cambodian plain and 625-meter (2051ft) above sea level. Lying out on an 800-meter north-south axis, the Preah Vihear complex has a single imposing approach, leading up through a series of five Gopura (towered entrance pavilions) connected by causeways and 120-meter-long steps. The temple gives its name to Cambodia’s Preah Vihear province and is 140km from Angkor Wat; approximately 460 km from Phnom Penh. 
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